Invaluable

The word invaluable, defined as something extremely useful or indispensable, means powerful and positive. I despise this word. The problem for me that many of the words I’ve learned over the years, which begin with ‘in,’ describe something opposite the definition of the word that follows said ‘in.’ So, my mind has to shift from it being something negative to it being positive. Why is the English language so damn wishy-washy about its rules?

Here is a list of just a few of the words we’ve all grown up to understand as the opposite just because the ‘in’ is in front of it:

incompatible
incomplete
incomprehensible
inconsequential
inexpensive
incommunicative
infallibility
ineffective
ineligible
incomparable
incapable
inappropriate
ineffectual
inconsistent

Add to that, pet peeve #2, people using the word when I’m already conflicted about having to rethink it when I read it! How come they aren’t just as upset as I am?!? And why can’t anyone give me a reasonable explanation as to why the word should even exist?

Then recently, I’m reading a book called 180 more, a book filled with poetry curated by Billy Collins. I adore his work! But right there in the introduction, HE used the word. I was stunned! I had to stop reading for a bit and compose myself. And possibly rethink my relationship with him.

While I realize that words have meanings, and it is in the dictionary, I cannot wrap my mind around the inconsistency (< again LOOK!) of the use of ‘in’ at the front of words which clearly mean to indicate the opposite or worse action of the word.

Anybody else have this quandary?

#Billy Collins – I sure hope you see this. I would love your input. 🙂

Webster’s Rules

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Thanks – David Fitzgerald 

How ironic to receive this meme from a friend today! I’m chuckling still. 🙂

What needs to be said is that words have a specific meaning. This is why we have dictionaries. They remind us how to use words in their correct context. Does and can the definition of a word change over time? Of course. But if we are using a current definition of something then this is what informs us about the content while reading or guiding us, does it not?

Otherwise, isn’t deviating from the definition of a word to satisfy one’s own interpretation simply just making up something entirely new but still wanting to call it the same thing? It’s illogical, IMO, if we already have an established norm for sharing information.

Thoughts welcomed!

Give Children Their Voice

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Respect doesn’t come easily to youth’s life experience in progress. We put them in their place…

Shut up, youngin’.

What do they know, right?

Shaming leads to silence. It leads to rage. Don’t do that.

A well thought out opinion deserves an audience, even if only one is there to receive it.

Contributions of spoken information are the right of any individual, young or old.
Let’s hear it all.

Encouraging communication honors the conviction of the orator. Let them learn, respect their effort. Challenge the thought process, if it requires it, but let them speak.

Embrace their courage, honor their thoughts. Let them talk.

Their experience, their journeys will shape future discussions, better lives possibly.

All humans feel valuable to others and especially themselves when they are accepted.

Respect their language and their self-expression.

Let them become adults who are heard.